21 Snaps Of Hospital Meals Taken From Around The World

21 Snaps Of Hospital Meals Taken From Around The World

21 Snaps Of Hospital Meals Taken From Around The World

When you think hospital food, a whole lot of rubbish and slimy mush probably springs to mind.

For years, people have questioned how on Earth people are expected to get better when all they have to look forward to are unidentifiable grey blobs for dinner (see Scotland’s — erm, shall we say delicacy, on this list).

According to The Guardian, over 80,000 hospital meals go uneaten every day, with two thirds of hospital staff confessing that they wouldn’t eat the stuff they give to the patients. And with all this in mind, who can really blame them?

But is it really so bad? What about the hospital foods served in other countries?

If you’ve ever wondered what a plate of nosh would look like in other places, then we’re about to find out.

Surprisingly enough, a lot of it actually looks edible – we’d even go as far as to say some of this stuff looks pretty darn good.

On the other hand, we’re having some trouble figuring out what some of these foods even are… So here is an insight into the good, the bad, and the ugly of hospital food.

Some of these are guaranteed to shock you.

Grub’s up, everyone!

Japan

Honestly better than we can cook at home.

One lady went about snapping all the meals she had whilst staying in a Japanese hospital.

One of her meals included sea bream, pasta salad, chicken meatballs, pickled daikon, rice, miso soup, chawan mushi and green tea. 

Another was a delicious selection of mushroom pasta, potato salad, broccoli and bacon salad, chicken soup, fruit, bread, green tea.

I think I might have a cough developing.

Germany

Looks acceptable as a selection of comfort foods – other than the plain lettuce, what’s that about?

On the British Forces Healthcare in Germany website, they say:

‘Our partner hospitals do their best to offer food that you will enjoy and seek to provide British or international style food and a choice of menu. In Germany the main meal is taken in the middle of the day rather than in the evening.’

So expect your bigger portions in the afternoon, and a slightly smaller portion in the evening.

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